Classical String Trio and Classical String Quartet Comparison

Effesenden Music is well known for our emphasis on playing music that reflects our brides and grooms own unique style.  Rather than applying a “one size fits all approach,” every single wedding we play has it’s own unique musical plan.  We love arranging popular music for our musicians to perform but we also have great respect for the timeless beauty of traditional wedding pieces such as Canon in D, Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring and more and enjoy presenting authentic, quality renditions of these great Classical works.

This blog post features samples from two weddings we played during the summer of 2011.  On a related note, click the link below if you’d like to see a list of our current songs for classical string trio and quartet.

Effesenden Music Classical Menu

The first set of musical samples are from a wonderful outdoor wedding at Garden Vineyards in June with our string quartet.

Canon in D–Pachelbel

Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring–Bach

Air on the G String–Bach

The second wedding was an indoor ceremony at the beloved Old Church in Southwest Portland, Oregon featuring our string trio.  I especially enjoyed this wedding because there were a number of Romantic period and slightly lesser known Classical works along with some more traditional Baroque.

Barcarole–Offenbach

Theme from Jupiter–Holst

I Love Thee–Grieg

Brandenburg Concerto No 3 (Allegro)–Bach

Many of our brides and grooms who are planning to use strings look for guidance on whether to opt for string trio or quartet.  The difference is that the quartet includes 2 violins, viola and cello whereas the trio is either violin, viola and cello or 2 violins and cello.  The quartet has greater richness and a slightly larger repertoire but the two ensembles are very similar in what they offer.

For comparison, I’ve included a recording of our string trio playing an excerpt from Canon in D.

Canon in D (for string trio)

If you’re like most couples, you’re probably making a lot of decisions like this in the planning—“Option A offers just a little bit more but Option B is really nice and saves a bit on the cost.”  My best advice is to work with an ensemble whose music you can tell is high quality and then choose the length of reservation and ensemble size based on your budget.  Maybe you could get an 8-piece band of amateur string players for the same price as a high quality string quartet but quantity doesn’t mean better!

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